A social media diet for the social media reticent co-founder

My friend and co-founder @anselmelevan is not very active on Twitter. I think he doesn’t see the benefits of the platform and still thinks it’s something where people talk about what they’re eating.
On my end, I’ve been on Twitter since 2008 and still think it is one of the best things ever. I also think that it can be a great customer discovery channel for our company, MadKudu.

So I’m trying a 30-day pass/fail experiment to see if I can get him:

I could have sent him an email, but I’m pretty sure there might be other cofounders (or VP Marketing) out there with a similar issue. So, I’ve decided to over-share this.

We’re starting at 19 tweets, 27 following and 33 followers. Let’s see where this can go. I’ll probably amend this as the experiment progress.

 Base rules

 Rule #1: Make your twitter feed interesting for you.

If your feed sucks, you’re not going to want to use twitter.

 Rule #2: Be natural.

Tweet about stuff you care about. If you try to hide behind a persona it will get boring. See rule #1

 Rule #3: Don’t just retweet the corporate account tweets.

That’s just plain boring. Why would I follow the CEO if I’m already following the corporate account? Except the guy behind the other account actually engages with me.

 Rule #4: Engage with people

Twitter can be great as a content feed, but I’ve had my best experiences when I was able to engage with people on a consistent basis. It’s a great place to test ideas, ask for help or simply be useful. Its main advantage is not having any of the conventions of email.
(Note: Accounts that are just one-way publishing platforms are just plain boring. Unfollow them)

 Rule #5: Persevere.

Twitter can be a vapid place (live-tweets of the VMAs, stupid hashtags). It can also be a fascinating place where you see things you won’t see anywhere else (#Ferguson)

 Daily regimen

 Tweet two interesting articles a day.

Whenever you read something cool, post it to Twitter.
Don’t use (only) the article title in the tweet. Make it personal.
If the author of the article is on twitter, mention them in the tweet

 Follow 5 new persons a day

Make it an habit of following 5 new people of day. Don’t worry about following too many people. Just unfollow when someone starts not being relevant.

 Engage with one tweet per day

When you see an interesting link or article, engage with the author. At worst, do a simple retweet. At best, ask a question or add something to the conversation.

 Ask openly for something once per week

Have a passing question to which you don’t know the answer? Try asking openly on Twitter once a week. You might be surprised.

The goal here is to spend less than 10 minutes per day. Don’t spend more for now. I need you somewhere else ;-)

Other tips to add?
Reach out on Twitter:

@paulcothenet

@anselmelevan

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